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July 20, 2009 | by  | in Film | [ssba]

Wake in Fright (1971)

film

Wake in Fright aka Outback is a filthy, dusty, sticky, sweaty, beer-drenched film. Its soundtrack is a sometimes overwhelming cacophony of men yelling. It’s full of men who congregate in bars, scull beer, gamble and sometimes fight. Basically, it depicts Australians doing what we assume they do all the time—drink VB and fight kangaroos.

The plot is simple. John Grant is a British school teacher in the tiny town of Tiboonda. From the opening shot the setting is established as being in the absolute middle of nowhere, in the most barren of the Australian plains. On his way to Sydney for the summer holidays, he stops in the nearby town of Bundanyabba only to lose all of his money in a game of coin toss. Stuck in the ‘yabba, the rest of the story follows John as his white suit becomes drenched in beer, blood and dust as he befriends some of the locals.

There is a tension that never lets up in this film. It is the Australian hospitality, which is more hostile than hospitable. Having a beer bought for you is a test of whether you are a ‘good bastard’ or not, and heaven forbid a man should turn down a fellow bloke’s offer. In fact, if anything it is the worst crime that is possible. I don’t think I’ve ever seen so much beer in a film. Beer is actually used as a symbol of Grant’s decline; at the start he can’t even finish a glass, yet toward the end he’s covered in it.

Wake in Fright is often called Australia’s great lost film due to its scarcity for many years. The Festival has acquired a great print of it, with a dustiness that seems like part of the film stock. The infamous Kangaroo hunting scenes are both exhilarating and terrifying, especially since it is clearly real. Director Ted Kotcheff would go on to make First Blood many years later, a film that also deals with the consequences for an outsider in a backwater town. This film prefigures many of the same traits which defined that film, a simplicity in constructing action sequences and a penchant for Eisensteinian montage every now and then. This film is an amazing spectacle that is truthfully unforgettable with many of the scenes as searing as the outback sun. Life lesson—never set foot in any town that ends in ‘yabba.

Wake in Fright (1971)
Directed by Ted Kotcheff
With Gary Bond, Donald Pleasence and Chips Rafferty
Showing as part of the International Film Festival 2009

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